Sport's Illustrated on Unequal's Gyro helmet liner being military-grade football protection

Under the brightest of Friday night lights, a little history was made on December 19 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. When Cedar Park took on Ennis for the 5A Conference, Division 2 championship, which Ennis won 38-35, it was more than a football game between Austin and Dallas-area schools. A Pennsylvania-based company known as Unequal touted the matchup as the first time two opposing high schools would meet in a Texas State High School football championship game with supplemental protection -- a product Unequal calls Gyro -- inside their helmets.

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Championship Contenders Protects their Heads With Unequal

Though they hail from different parts of Texas, head coach Jack Alvarez and head coach Joe Willis made the same decision at the beginning of their 2014 high school football seasons. They made head protection a primary focus for athlete safety. It’s not that they wouldn’t normally do everything within their power to protect their athletes. They both take athlete safety extremely seriously. What makes their decisions uniquely similar is their approach to head protection.

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Medical Report concludes "Helmets with Unequal predict a significantly lower risk of concussions."

After the 2013 season, team doctor Dr. Chad Stephens, D.O., pulled together data from his football team and reached out for additional data that had been captured at 13 other high schools around the country and in Canada involving 1159 players. He compared the concussion rate of players using Unequal vs. those that did not use Unequal. His aggregation of data tell a dramatic story.  Players that chose to wear Unequal experienced a .9% concussion rate. Those not choosing to wear Unequal experienced a 9.4% concussion rate. Dr. Stephens conclusion: "I concur with the analysis of neurosurgeons Dr. Julian Bailes and Dr. Joe Maroon that 'helmets with Unequal predict a significantly lower risk of concussions."

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Illinois College Players Discover Unequal Technologies

JACKSONVILLE — When the Illinois College football team took the field Saturday afternoon for its Homecoming game against Monmouth College, its newest weapon wasn’t visible to fans. Most of the Blueboys’ 100 or so players have begun wearing a supplemental helmet liner designed to reduce the risk of concussions. And while the Unequal Gyro isn’t a panacea for all head trauma, an Illinois College administrator said it’s a necessary step to leading the charge on student-athlete safety.

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Engineering The Ideal Olympian via Popular Science

The 2010 Winter Olympics had the same overall injury rate as the Summer Olympics in 2012—for both, it was about 11 percent. But Torbjorn Soligard, an officer at the medical and scientific department of the International Olympic Committee, says severe acute injuries (such as torn ligaments) are more common in the Winter Games because so many of the events involve high speeds. Once scientists target frequent injuries, new safety tools can help mitigate the risks.

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Unequal Protective Gear Used by Freestyle Snowmobile Competitors

Unequal® Technologies has custom created a new Freestyle Vest, for freestyle snowmobile riders to help reduce the risk of injuries resulting from crashes or falls. The Freestyle Vest uses Unequal's patented, military-grade composite fortified with Kevlar®, distinctive green Accelleron, and ImpacShield to protect the chest, shoulders, spine and ribs. In addition to the vest, many riders have elected to use custom applications of Unequal's ultrathin composite on their roost protectors.

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Unequal Turns Bright Gold for Sochi 2014 Winter Games

As qualifiers make final preparations for the winter games in Sochi this February, athletes in snowboarding, slopestyle, ski cross, hockey and bobsled have turned to Unequal Technologies' highly protective, ultrathin sports gear for an additional edge in competition. In halfpipe snowboarding, Australia's 2010 Olympic gold medal winner Torah Bright and U.S. siblings Arielle and Taylor Gold trust Unequal supplemental padding in their helmet, on their body and in their boots. In men's hockey, U.S. goalie Ryan Miller's mask is fortified with Unequal. U.S. ski cross champion John Teller wears Unequal in his helmet and on his body. U.S. snowboard slopestyle athlete Ty Walker won't compete without Unequal in her helmet.

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Unequal provides secret ingredient for Sochi Olympics via Keystone Edge

Barreling around Sochi in the upcoming Winter Olympics, snowboarders Arielle and Taylor Gold, Torah Bright and Benji Farrow, and the entire U.S. Bobsled team will carry hidden, high-tech protection produced by Glen Mills' Unequal Technologies. The snowboarders’ helmets and the bobsleds will be lined with Unequal's military-grade composite padding -- an Esquire.com blogger recently named it the number one tech innovation of 2013.

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